Barbecue

whole hog at Wilbur's Barbecue
whole hog at Wilbur's Barbecue
May 28, 2017
(was 07.12.2015)

Supersized slabs of juicy ribs cooked over a wood fire until the meat slides right off the bone. Food doesn't get more American than barbecue. It's part of our roots. And it's tangled up in our racial history. In this hour, we celebrate barbecue and explore its secret history.

  1. Barbecue: America's National Folk Food

    John T. Edge is the Director of the Southern Foodways Alliance and a James Beard Award-winning writer. He says we're living in a Golden Age of barbecue and he talks about barbecue's troubled racial history.

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  2. The Queen of Barbecue

    Helen Turrner is the "Queen of Barbecue," the owner and pitmaster of Helen's Bar-B-Q in Brownsville, Tennessee. She's one of the few women pitmasters.

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  3. Barbecue and Racism

    Historian Andrew Warnes is the author of "Savage Barbecue: Race, Culture, and the Invention of America's First Food." He talks about the undercurrents of racism in the history of barbecue.

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  4. KC BBQ

    Doug Worgul works for Joe's Kansas City Bar-B-Que in Olathe, Kansas. He's also a writer and the author of a barbecue novel called, "Thin Blue Smoke." He explains what makes Kansas City style barbecue different from other styles.

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  5. Man Alive!: Struck by Barbecue

    How's this for a novel premise? Owen Lerner is a pediatric psychiatrist. One day, he's struck by lightning. He survives but he has a new obsession -- with barbecue. That's the premise behind Mary Kay Zuravleff's novel, "Man Alive!" She talks about its inspiration and the book's themes.

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