Contemplating Our Selves

02.17.2012

Antoinetter Varner - also known as Gangaji - says she spent decades wrestling with and reshaping her narrative identity. But when she met her true spiritual teacher - a Hindu man vaguely alligned with the nondualist tradition - he told her to stop all stories. Gangaji says that's when she was finally able to connect with the "I" that underlies our selves.

Steve Paulson asked Gangaji about her story, and the end of stories.  

Listen to the UNCUT version of this interview here.

 

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Comments

Gangaji, as well as Eckhart Tolle and Byron Katie point to the eternal truth within our selves.

I believe this consciousness is in a sense equal to the soul: it is the soul that realized it is one with its creator, behind the universe, living in the heart.

I suggest listening to Alfred Webre also, who is an exopolitics expert, lawyer, as it is now known that higher dimensions with multiple universes include non-Earthly friends with mostly at least the same high level of consciousness as these enlightened masters of us, helping us now in these challenging times.

May consciousness and love be with us. Conscious silence.

I'm not so sure about Eckhart Tolle being on par with Gangaji. Tolle still speaks of a duality in terms of God AND forms. That is dualism. That is not the Advaita or nondualism being taught by Gangaji.

Thank you for your gift of understanding

Catholic theologians and monks, perhaps someone like Fr. Thomas Keating, would be great people to interview as well as this articulate person Gangaji. Consider the reality of "original sin" as the explanation for distorting the stories of ourselves and the possibility of the redemption of self by God - the origin of truth and reality - in whose image we are made. The inner capacity for self contemplation (self, reflection of self by self, and the dialog of self and self reflection) was perceived by St. Augustine as one piece of evidence suggesting we are made in the image of God who is love and is an interplay of unity and diversity - Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Consider also God speaking to Moses that He was "I am who I am" in the Jewish Bible. Echoes very nicely with the interview broadcasted...

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