Food and Politics

04.21.2013
(was 06.10.2012)

Imagine a farm five stories tall, powered by the sun, watered by the rain. Cabbage and carrots, tomatoes and eggplant grow on living walls. Tens of thousands of fish swim in aquaponic tanks. In this hour, the urban farm of the future gets real. Also, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin,  MacArthur genius Will Allen is growing food for the inner city -- and a new politics of food and farming.  And yet another thing French children do better: eat!

  1. Dickson Despommier on Vertical Farming

    The future of farming may be up in the air -- literally.  Microbiologist Dickson Despommier's concept of skyscraper farming has excited scientists, architects and politicians.  Could multi-story farms solve the global hunger problem?

    4.25
    Average: 4.3 (8 votes)
  2. Will Allen on Urban Farming

    In 1993, Will Allen bought a 2-acre plot of land in Milwaukee's inner city.  Today, it's the nation's pre-eminent urban farm.  Growing Power is a working farm that feeds thousands of local residents and helps develop community food systems.  Allen won a MacArthur "genius" grant for his work.  

    5
    Average: 5 (10 votes)
  3. Karen Le Billon on French Kids Eat Everything

    In the U.S., a typical school lunch might consist of pizza or chicken nuggets.  In France, it's a four-course hot meal, which all students are required to eat.  When Karen Le Billon moved to France with her children, she -- and they -- discovered that French children do not snack, are not overweight, and "eat everything." 

    4.77778
    Average: 4.8 (27 votes)
  4. Jennet Conant on Julia Child and the O.S.S.

    Before she was became "The French Chef," Julia Child worked in espionage for the O.S.S. during World War II.  That's where she met her husband Paul.   Biographer Jennet Conant tells the story of Julia's career in espionage, and of how the couple navigated the McCarthy investigations.

    4.4
    Average: 4.4 (5 votes)
  5. Aaron Bobrow-Strain on White Bread

    A loaf of fluffy white store-bought bread may look innocent -- but conceals a rich political and economic history.  Aaron Bobrow-Strain charts the rise and fall of white bread and reveals what's really at stake when we argue about food.    

    4.7
    Average: 4.7 (10 votes)