The Language of Science Fiction

09.09.2012
(was 09.25.2011)

China Mieville’s new novel, “Embassytown,” features sentient beings famous for their unique language and a woman who’s a living simile. Ursula K. LeGuin says that “Embassytown” is “a fully-achieved work of art.” We’ll meet China Mieville, as we explore the language of science fiction.  Also, the far-out, cosmic poetry of  Sun Ra.

  1. China Miéville on "Embassytown"

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    China Miéville´s new novel is called "Embassytown."  It features aliens that speak a strange language in a strange way -- with two voices simultaneously.  Miéville spoke with Anne Strainchamps about "Embassytown."

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  2. Samuel R. Delany on "The Jewel-Hinged Jaw: Notes on the Language of Science Fiction"

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    Samuel R. Delany has been described as "American science fiction's most consistently brilliant and inventive writer."  Delany's non-fiction includes the essay collection, "The Jewel-Hinged Jaw: Notes on the Language of Science Fiction."  He talked to Steve Paulson about his love of language.

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    Average: 4.9 (14 votes)
  3. Seo-Young Chu on "Do Metaphors Dream of Literal Sleep?"

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    In her book, "Do Metaphors Dream of Literal Sleep?: A Science-Fictional Theory of Representation," Seo-Young Chu argues that science fiction is a kind of "high-intensity realism."  She spoke with Jim Fleming.

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    Average: 4.6 (26 votes)
  4. Amiri Baraka on "This Planet Is Doomed: The Science Fiction Poetry of Sun Ra"

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    Celebrated poet, playwright and activist Amiri Baraka wrote the foreword to the book, "This Planet Is Doomed: The Science Fiction Poetry of Sun Ra."  He spoke to Steve Paulson about Sun Ra's music and poetry.

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    Average: 4.3 (15 votes)