Peak Performance

Alex Honnold

Jimmy Chin (Penguin Randomhouse)

June 18, 2017

Alex Honnold and Tommy Caldwell have scaled some of the most dangerous rock faces on the planet. Honnold made headlines this month when he climbed Yosemite’s El Capitan without a rope for the first time in history. We talk with both about fear, risk and resilience. We also examine the science of “flow” states and peak performance.

  1. The Audacity of the World's Most Daring Climber

    Alex Honnold stunned the world by climbing El Capitan without a rope. So how did he do it? And why take such a chance?

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  2. Hanging Out On Top of Cliffs Is My Happy Place

    Tommy Caldwell’s ascent of Yosemite’s Dawn Wall was the hardest rock climb in history. But it wasn’t his hardest ordeal.

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  3. Alex Honnold’s Most Dangerous Adventure

    He may have already conquered El Capitan, but Alex Honnold can dream up far more daring and dangerous adventures.

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  4. The Science of Peak Performance

    You know those moments when everything clicks and you’re performing at your peak? There’s a science behind flow states.

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  5. The Myth of the “Dumb Jock”

    Neuroscientist John Krakauer blasts the “dumb jock” stereotype with research on the cognitive brilliance of athletes.

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  6. The Ultimate Long-Distance Race

    So you’re a serious runner? Consider the Self-Transcendence Race, running around the same half-mile loop for 3100 miles.

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