Peter Kornbluh on "The Pinochet File"

September 7, 2003

Peter Kornbluh, directs the National Security Archive’s Chile Documentation Project.  He’s just published “The Pinochet File,” which uses recently declassified documents to prove that there was American involvement at the highest levels of government in the efforts to foment chaos in Chile. Kornbluh tells Jim Fleming that Henry Kissinger went after Salvador Allende against the advice of his own advisors.

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Friends,

I have listened to TTBOOK for decades because of the superb interviews by Anne, Steve and later Jim.

Now the quality of the interviews is plummeting because --frankly and sadly-- a number of the new people doing interviews are lousy at asking interesting questions and providing the follow-up questions that give depth and richness to an interview.

Unless you get some better people (and surely there MUST be many talented individuals on local NPR affiliates) the show will lose most of its audience when Anne and Steve retire.

Admittedly the two of them are extraordinary at what they do. However, that's all the more reason that you simply can't turn over the job to people you happen to work with and expect great results.

I feel bad that lately I often just stop listening to pieces because I'm bored. That never happened in the "old days."

Friends,

I have listened to TTBOOK for decades because of the superb interviews by Anne, Steve and later Jim.

Now the quality of the interviews is plummeting because --frankly and sadly-- a number of the new people doing interviews are lousy at asking interesting questions and providing the follow-up questions that give depth and richness to an interview.

Unless you get some better people (and surely there MUST be many talented individuals on local NPR affiliates) the show will lose most of its audience when Anne and Steve retire.

Admittedly the two of them are extraordinary at what they do. However, that's all the more reason that you simply can't turn over the job to people you happen to work with and expect great results.

I feel bad that lately I often just stop listening to pieces because I'm bored. That never happened in the "old days."

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