Radical Gardening

April 11, 2010
(was 06.21.2009)

The world of plants can be a dangerous place. Gorgeous monkshood, with stalks of purple blooms can cause delusions and death. A plump cashew can make you miserable if it isn't steamed properly. And aconite, almost indistinguishable from parsley can cause paralysis and stop your beating heart. Wicked plants, on To the Best of Our Knowledge. Also, the guerrilla gardening movement and the Garden of Cosmic Speculation.

  1. James William Gibson on Reenchanted World

    James WIlliam Gibson talks about ways in which people are seeking to reconnect with the natural world and to protect it, rather than simply exploit it as a resource.

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  2. Amy Stewart on Poisonous Plants

    Quick lesson in plants: Don't eat it unless you're sure you know what it is.

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  3. Richard Reynolds on Guerilla Gardening

    Richard Reynolds tells Anne Strainchamps about his adventures as a guerrilla gardener, that is, someone who tends someone else's land for harvest.

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  4. Erin Clune on Extravagant Garden

    Erin Clune brings us and her family to tour the garden of Izzy Fine and Mary Gray who've planted thousands of flowering bulbs on their property in Madison, Wisconsin. Their garden is so spectacular, all the neighbors drop by to wander around.

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  5. Charles Jencks and Michael Gandolfi on The Garden of Cosmic Speculation

    Architect Charles Jencks and his late wife started a private garden to explore scientific concepts through landscape art. Jencks published a book of photographs of The Garden of Cosmic Speculation, which inspired composer Michael Gandolfi to create a piece further exploring the same ideas.

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