On the Radio

Week of December 4, 2016

Making A Home

December 4, 2016

Anyone who’s moved knows how difficult it can be to settle into a new place. Whether it’s another country or an apartment just down the block, it takes time and work to get comfortable. We’re living through a period of mass human migration, with people on the move all over the planet. This hour, we’re talking about home – how to take an unfamiliar place and make it yours.
 

  1. A Violinist Flees Syria and Discovers a New Home in the US

    Three years ago, violinist Mariela Shaker escaped the Syrian Civil War and relocated to the US, moving from Aleppo, a city of 2 million people, to a small Illinois town of less than 10,000. Here’s how she found home in an unfamiliar place.

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  2. How 'Home' Made Us Human

    The sense of home, of feeling safe and secure, is so essential to our everyday lives. Neuroanthropologist John S. Allen believes there’s a deeper significance to that pull back home. He believes the home is one of the most important inventions in our evolution, one that marked our shift from nest-building apes to humans. Steve Paulson caught up with him to find out why.

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  3. For Some Veterans, the Return Home is the Hardest Part of Their Tour

    For some veterans, coming home from war can often be a struggle. In his book "Tribe," journalist Sebastian Junger offers a nuanced and thought provoking take on why it’s so difficult and complicated for some returning veterans. He believes that it’s not combat that’s the problem. Instead, it’s something that’s missing from our culture: a sense of being part of a tribe.

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  4. Bookmark: Jonathan Chait recommends “What Hath God Wrought” by Daniel Walker Howe

    When and how did American get so polarized? For answers, Jonathan Chait recommends reading "What Hath God Wrought,"  a history of American politics from 1815-1848 by the Pulitzer prize-winning historian Daniel Walker Howe.

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  5. The Revolutionary War’s Impact on America

    Children’s novelist Laurie Halse Anderson has just come out with her long-awaited final volume in her “Seeds of America” trilogy, which follows three young slaves during the American Revolution. In the book, "Ashes," white colonists everywhere can be heard talking about liberty and freedom – just not for African Americans. Laurie traces our nation’s deep history of racial injustice to its origins in 1776.

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Saving Language

December 4, 2016
(was 06.23.2014)

Fifty to ninety percent of the world's languages are predicted to disappear in the next century.  And because language is the DNA of culture, a lost language is a lost culture.  Today, a look at efforts to save endangered languages before they go extinct.

  1. Language Warriors - David Harrison

    David Harrison travels to some of the most remote places in the world, documenting endangered languages.  He tells us about the language warriors:  the last speakers of ancestral languages.  Many of them are trying to preserve and revive their native tongues.

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  2. Yung Yiddish - Danna Harman

    Journalist Danna Harman takes us to the epicenter of the rebirth of a dying language -- the Yung Yiddish library in Tel Aviv.   This story is part of a collaboration between TTBOOK and the Hebrew-language radio show, "Israel Story."

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  3. The Word Exchange - Alena Graedon

    Alena Graedon's debut novel is an intellectual thriller set in the near future.  Print is dead, words have been monetized, and a "word flu" is running rampant.  The book is called "The Word Exchange."

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  4. The Hippie Doctor

    Larry Brilliant is a doctor, co-founder of the digital social network the Well, and he was the first executive director of Google.org. But back in the Sixties, he was a hippie doctor who joined Wavy Gravy's traveling bus caravan and then landed in an Indian ashram in the Himalayas, where his guru told him his destiny was to help cure smallpox. Miraculously, his U.N. team of doctors eradicated the world's remaining cases of this terrible disease. He tells Steve Paulson about a remarkable moment in history when anything seemed possible.

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