On the Radio

Week of April 26, 2015

The Quantified Self

April 26, 2015

A new generation of fitness trackers and wearable computers has ushered in a era of "quantifying" various aspects of our lives. But can all these numbers actually lead to real insights about who we are?

  1. From Bites to Bytes - Quantifying the Everyday

    Over the last several years, new developments in personal health tracking products have multiplied exponentially. But human interest in measuring and tracking elements of our bodily needs stretches back hundreds of years. Professor Natasha Schüll discusses these current trends and their history, based on research she's done for a forthcoming book called "Keeping Track."

    0
    No votes yet
    Vote rating for this content.
  2. Does Data Give Life Meaning?

    Nicholas Felton transforms data into something beautiful. As a self-described "information designer" and extremely dedicated life logger, he tracks aspects of his life over the course of the year and then publishes them as "annual reports."

    0
    No votes yet
    Vote rating for this content.
  3. The Sonified Self - Transforming Data Into Music

    The process of data sonification is exactly what it sounds like: the translation of data points into various sounds, each with unique characteristics that can change over time. So instead of turning your spreadsheets into charts and graphs, they can now be turned into a kind of music. Matt Kenney demonstrates how it's done.

    0
    No votes yet
    Vote rating for this content.
  4. Our Automated Future

    When Stephen Wolfram was 17, he dropped out of college. By the time he was 21, he had a Ph.D. in physics and was one of the first recipients of a MacArthur Genius Award. Today, he is the CEO of Wolfram Research and owner of one of the largest individual datasets in the world.

    0
    No votes yet
    Vote rating for this content.
  5. Chronicling, then Letting Go

    In her new memoir, "Ongoingness," Sarah Manguso talks about how keeping a diary—so often considered a virture—for her became a vice. But her obsessive diary keeping changed with the birth of her first child.

    0
    No votes yet
    Vote rating for this content.

Building Stories (Update)

April 26, 2015

Every space has a sound and every sound tells a story. No metaphor here, nothing fancy, we mean actual stories about actual buildings.Good stories and bad ones too.

  1. Stories from Cabrini Green

    When the last of the infamous Chicago Public Housing buildings were demolished Audrey Petty asked herself a few questions, “Where did everybody go?” And, “what are their memories?”

    0
    No votes yet
    Vote rating for this content.
  2. Ever Wonder About the Sounds a Building Makes?

    Sound engineer Ryan Schimmenti put it best, "every space has a sound, every sound tells a story." Using high-end equipment he documents and records the "voices" of buildings.

    There are a lot of those sounds in this piece. But if you want more . . .

     

    0
    No votes yet
    Vote rating for this content.
  3. Chris Ware on his graphic novel "Building Stories"

    The celebrated cartoonist Chris Ware has a graphic novel called “Building Stories.”  It is full of stories. It is an actual building. Steve Paulson says, “it’s like nothing he’s even seen or read before.”

    0
    No votes yet
    Vote rating for this content.
  4. Meat Houses. Yes, Houses Made Out of Meat

    Mitchell Joaquim and the Terreform 1 team are looking for new, organic ways of building homes… and cities. About 4 billion of us live in cities right now. Predictions are, by the end of this century, that number will be closer to 8 billion. That means, for the foreseeable future, we need to build the equivalent of a city of one million people EVERY WEEK... How?

    0
    No votes yet
    Vote rating for this content.
  5. Ken "The Voice" Nordine reads his jazz poem "Yellow"

    Ken Nordine is the epitome of jazz poetry. He has an amazing voice. His nickname is, in fact, "The Voice."  Best known for his Word Jazz series, this poem is one he did for a paint company. The paint company is long forgotten but the poem lives on.

    0
    No votes yet
    Vote rating for this content.
  6. Here, Bullet - War Poetry by Flashlight

    Brian Turner was an average young American who volunteered for military service in Iraq. At night he wrote poetry by flashlight. When his tour ended, he collected his poems into a book called "Here, Bullet." This one is called "A Night in Blue."

    0
    No votes yet
    Vote rating for this content.
  7. Poet Rae Armantrout on Reading Poetry Out Loud

    You know poems can be different things to different people: solace, a call to action, beauty. A reflection on war. But to Rae Armantrout there’s one thing that all poetry should be - read out loud.

    0
    No votes yet
    Vote rating for this content.