On the Radio

Week of June 26, 2016

Do Protests Still Matter?

June 26, 2016

When you don't have a voice, when you feel like lawmakers just won't listen to you, protest is one way of capturing the world's attention. From Selma to Ferguson, Tahrir Square to Zuccotti Park, political demonstrations have made history. But have they worked? This hour we explore the effectiveness of political protest.

  1. Why Protest Is Broken

    In 2011, Micah White helped launch one of the largest protest movements in a generation. He's had a lot of time to think about the legacy of Occupy Wall Street in the five years since, and he' s come to a surprising conclusion -- he believes protest is broken. He says activists have been using the same outdated scripts for decades and need to innovate in order to change the world. 

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  2. Barney Frank On Why Protests Don't Work

    Former Congressman Barney Frank believes that if you want to see political change, don't go to a demonstration. Instead, lobby your local representatives and vote. He spoke to Steve Paulson about effective grassroots organizing, and why the gay rights movement was so successful in the US.

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  3. Taking It To the Streets

    Since 2009, activist Cat Brooks has been leading protests against police violence in the Oakland area. She spoke about a recent protest she organized in reponse to a police sex scandal, and explains the value of disruptive actions in the Black Lives Matter Movement.

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  4. A Lifelong Activist

    Joseph Scheidler has been called the "godfather" of the anti-abortion movement. He's the founder of the Pro-Life Action League, and back in 1985 he published a seminal book on closing abortion clinics that's since inspired countless other activists. He spoke about what he's learned from his four decades as an activist.

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  5. The Craft Of Protesting

    Why is it that some protest movements force seismic change whereas others quickly burn out? Mark Engler is a journalist based in Philadelphia who believes there's a craft to protest. In "This Is An Uprising," he writes about a series of principles all activists can follow regardless of the cause.

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  6. Overcoming Fear Through Protest

    Egyptian psychiatrist Basma Abdel Aziz has long counseled survivors of torture and political repression, and she writes about the collective trauma inflicted by brutal autocratic regimes. Her latest novel, "The Queue," takes place after a popular revolution has toppled one dictator, only to have another faceless authority take his place. She says that even though present-day Egypt resembles the country under Hosni Mubarak, the Tahrir Sqare protests transformed the nation in a very important way -- they helped embolden citizens who for decades were gripped by fear.

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This Martian Life (Repeat)

June 26, 2016
(was 10.04.2015)

Sending humans to Mars used to seem like an impossible dream. But with the discovery of flowing water on Mars and the blockbuster movie "The Martian," even NASA is talking about a human mission to Mars. So why do people want to go to the Red Planet? We hear from a Mars One finalist and from the commander of one of NASA's Mars simulations; for 8 months she lived in a dome on the side of a volcano. Also, two science fiction heavyweights: Andy Weir describes the improbable origins of his blockbuster novel "The Martian," and Kim Stanley Robinson wonders what it would be like to travel to the nearest habitable star system 12 light years away. His answer? Like being trapped in a Motel 6.

SEE NASA'S "MARS EXPLORERS WANTED" POSTERS HERE

Producer(s): 
  1. One in A Hundred: Finalist for Private Mars Program On Her Hopes and Fears

    Mead McCormick is one of 100 finalists for the Mars One program, a private venture that hopes to start a colony on Mars by 2027. She talks to Anne Strainchamps about what attracted her to the project, what she imagines it will look like, and her fears about the blackness of space.

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  2. The Modern Mars MacGyver: Andy Weir on his Breakout Novel "The Martian"

    According to self-described "space dork" Andy Weir, he was just sitting around at home one day imagining a manned Mars mission — not with any goal in mind, but just as a thought experiment. Soon, he realized this would be a pretty good premise for a story. And boy was he right. His novel "The Martian" started as a series of blog posts and has become a blockbuster motion picture. In this interview, he reads excerpts from the novel and discusses the balance between pure fantasty and scientific accuracy in science fiction.

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  3. Simulating Mars — From a Dome in Hawaii

    Solar engineer Martha Lenio was the first woman to command a mission on the HI-SEAS — the Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation. It's a project co-sponsored by NASA and the Univeristy of Hawaii that simulates what it would be like to live on Mars for eight months. To survive in such extremes, they were sequestered into a 1,000 square foot dome, and when they went outside they had to wear space suits. When Lenio got there, she said it didn't feel much like Mars, but she changed her mind after 8 months without the sun and wind on her skin. She spoke with Anne Strainchamps about missing her family — and missing YouTube cat videos.

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  4. Could Traveling to Mars Save Humanity?

    Long before the discovery of water on Mars or Matt Damon's star turn in The Martian, Robert Zubrin has been advocating for a human mission to mars. His book, The Case for Mars, made a splash when it was first published in 1996, and has continued to be influential in both scientific and science fiction circles. Zubrin calls Mars "the Rosetta Stone" for understanding life in the universe. But he's not just interested in science. He also thinks the sheer challenge would bring positive and uplifting change to all of humankind.

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  5. Whistlers and Bow Shocks: Hearing the Sounds of Space

    Have you ever heard that space is a vaccuum? That space is totally silent? Well, neither of those things is exactly true. Thanks to the research of physicist Don Gurnett, we now know there are thin layers of gas in space that produce all kinds of interesting waves — including sound waves. In this segment, we talk with Gurnett about his research and listen to some downright strange and wondrous sounds from both near and deep space.

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  6. Leaving the Cradle: Kim Stanley Robinson on Traveling Beyond Our Star System

    Russian rocket scientist Konstantin Tsiolkovsky once said, "The Earth is the cradle of humanity, but mankind cannot stay in the cradle forever." Kim Stanley Robinson takes this idea as the premise of his new novel "Aurora," which chronicles a 200-year space voyage outside of our solar system. For Robinson, contemplating the journey was both technical and emotional. Several generations would live and die on the spaceship. Robinson says the story turned into a "prison novel." He talks with Steve Paulson about his vision for science fiction and for humanity.

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