On the Radio

Week of December 21, 2014

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Fearing the Other

December 21, 2014

Are Americans afraid of black men? That's one of the issues at the heart of the national debate over the deaths of Michael Brown, Eric Garner, and Tamir Rice. This hour, we take a closer look at negative stereotypes about African American men, how those biases affect our justice system, and what we might be able to do about it.

  1. Addressing Bias

    What happens when you discover racial fear in yourself? Rachel Shadoan recently reached an uncomfortable conclusion: she was afraid of black men. Rachel was appalled and decided to do something about it. She tells her story in an article titled, "I am racist and so are you."

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  2. Condemning Blackness

    At the heart of many Americans' fear of black men is an ugly stereotype -- the stereotype of the black criminal. Historian Khalil Gibran Muhammad traces some of our current attitudes about race and crime to the late 19th century, when sociologists first began looking at crime statistics.

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  3. What Do You Fear?

    Everyone's afraid of something. Here's a small sampling of fears from Question Bridge: Black Males, a transmedia project that fosters dialogue between African American men of diverse backgrounds.

    Question Bridge: Black Males was created by Chris Johnson and Hank WIllis Thomas, with Bayeté Ross Smith and Kamal Sinclair.

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  4. Not Calling the Police

    The high profile deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner have raised all sorts of questions about racial profiling and the use of force by law enforcement. For writer Emily Bazelon, the debate has also raised an ethical question: When do you call the cops on an African American man?

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  5. Reforming the LAPD

    Inspired by stories of police brutality and the Rodney King beating, civil rights attorney Connie Rice says she declared "war" on the LAPD in the 1990s. These days, she trains and supervises 50 officers in one of Los Angeles' toughest communities.

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  6. Dangerous Idea: Love Your Enemy

    Writer Karen Armstrong's dangerous idea is to love your enemies.

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  7. On Our Minds: Hip Hop Prophets

    Alex Gee is the Pastor of Fountain of Life Church in Madison, Wisconsin and co-author (with John Teter) of Jesus and the Hip Hop Prophets: Spiritual Insights from Lauryn Hill and 2PAC. Reverend Gee tells Steve Paulson how rappers like Tupac Shakur function as prophets for the hip hop generation, and how he incorporates rap music into his liturgy.

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Walking

December 21, 2014

Walk long enough and far enough, and you will never be the same.  This week, stories of people who transformed their lives by picking up their feet, blazing trails, and going off-road.

  1. "Walking Saved My Life" - Cheryl Strayed

    Girl loses self, solo hikes 1,000 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail, and finds herself.  Cheryl Strayed's best-selling memoir "Wild" is now a movie, starring Reese Witherspoon.  Cheryl makes the case for walking as a life-saving act.

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  2. What Makes Werner Walk?

    Filmmaker Werner Herzog is obsessive about many things, including walking.   Listen to find out why Werner walks.

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  3. Grandma Gatewood's Walk

    Emma Gatewood had 11 children and 23 grandchildren when she became the first woman to hike the Appalachian Trail, at age 67.  She became a folk hero and helped save the Trail.  Ben Montgomery brings us her story.

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  4. Walking England's Coast

    Jules Pretty spent a year circumnavigating England's southeastern coast on foot.  He discovered tidal paths, secret roads, and beaches covered in tiny fragments of 18th century human bones.

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  5. Found Films - Manohla Dargis on Boyhood

    NY Times film critic Manohla Dargis selects her favorite film of the year:  Richard Linklater's "Boyhood," filmed over the course of 12 years.

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  6. This Year's Funniest Autobiography - John Cleese's New Memoir

    John Cleese gave us Monty Python and the Holy Grail, The Life of Brian, the Ministry of Silly Walks, and the neurotic hotel manager in Fawlty Towers.  He looks back over it all in his new memoir, "So, Anyway."

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