On the Radio

Week of August 12, 2017

Ice

Imagining Climate Change

August 12, 2017

“The climate crisis is a crisis of culture and thus of imagination,” says writer Amitav Ghosh. So what changes in our conversation about global warming when we tap into the imaginative worlds of novelists and artists?

Producer(s): 
  1. How Bad Can Climate Change Really Get?

    There’s a lot of scientific debate about the future of climate change. But have you ever considered the worst case scenario? David Wallace-Wells gives us one terrifying glimpse into the future.

    5
    Average: 5 (2 votes)
    Vote rating for this content.
  2. Where’s the Great “Climate Change Novel”?

    If climate change is the most urgent problem facing humanity, why are there so few novels about it? Acclaimed novelist Amitav Ghosh believes that’s a big problem. He says climate change is less a science problem than a crisis of imagination.

    5
    Average: 5 (2 votes)
    Vote rating for this content.
  3. Let’s Get Serious About the Anthropocene

    Historian Iain McCalman’s Dangerous Idea? The Anthropocene — the idea that humans have fundamentally changed our global climate. It’s scary, but we’re also seeing people come together in unprecedented ways to solve planetary problems.

    5
    Average: 5 (2 votes)
    Vote rating for this content.
  4. Zulu Time

    It’s hard to wrap your head around climate change. How do you really take in the concept of planetary change over decades or even centuries? Visual artist Kambui Olujimi explores different ideas about time in his one-man show “Zulu Time.”

    5
    Average: 5 (1 vote)
    Vote rating for this content.
  5. Lidia Yuknavitch’s Dream World

    We’re starting to see a new kind of fiction: climate fiction. Lidia Yuknavitch’s “The Book of Joan” is one of the most stunning examples. It’s the story of a near-future where Earth is decimated and the last few survivors are stranded in space.

    5
    Average: 5 (2 votes)
    Vote rating for this content.
prom

Awkward

August 13, 2017
(was 12.20.2015)

When was the last time you said something so mortifying that all you wanted to do was crawl under a rock and hide? We've all been through plenty of uncomfortable moments, but it seems like we rarely talk about them. From teenage angst to cringe comedy, this week we're setting aside the shame and reveling in all things awkward.

  1. Awkward Moments Read Out Loud

    For years, the Mortified stage show and podcast has brought people together from all walks of life to share their most painfully awkward teenage moments. The concept is simple -- participants open up their diaries to a packed theater and recount their most embarrassing stories, like a failed first kiss, an unrequited love, or a nightmarish prom date.  

    5
    Average: 5 (3 votes)
    Vote rating for this content.
  2. Our Awkward Age

    What is it about awkwardness that we can't seem to get enough of? Philosopher Adam Kotsko says our fascination with awkwardness is more than about entertainment -- it defines our modern era. He says we live in an age of awkwardness, which he traces back to the social and political turbulence of the 1960s.

    4
    Average: 4 (2 votes)
    Vote rating for this content.
  3. Jesse Eisenberg Imagines An Awkward Introduction

    For a true case study of an awkward situation, just head to the nearest pick-up bar. Here's what not to say when introducing yourself to a potential mate, in the words of actor and writer Jesse Eisenberg.

    4.333335
    Average: 4.3 (3 votes)
    Vote rating for this content.
  4. The Upside of Awkwardness

    When blogger Jenny Lawson recently tweeted about an awkward exchange she had with a cashier at an airport, she couldn't have imagined the flood of responses she'd get from fans recounting their own mortifying moments. The tweet went viral and within a few days she'd received thousands of messages from fans recounting their own awkward stories. The whole affair was proof of something Jenny had long suspected -- that awkwardness can help bring people together.

    5
    Average: 5 (3 votes)
    Vote rating for this content.
  5. Jennifer Jacquet Recommends 'Last Chance To See'

    Environmentalist Jennifer Jacquet qrecommends "Last Chance to See" by Douglas Adams and Mark Carwardine.

    4.666665
    Average: 4.7 (3 votes)
    Vote rating for this content.
  6. Rediscovering Alexander Von Humboldt, The Largely Forgotten Father Of Environmentalism

    Before John Muir - even before Charles Darwin - there was Alexander von Humboldt, the German scientist who shaped our modern understanding of nature. Today, he’s largely forgotten, but Humboldt was once the most famous scientist in the world. Historian Andrea Wulf has just written a biography of Humboldt called “The Invention of Nature,” which The New York Times has picked as one of this year’s ten best books. Steve Paulson recently sat down with Wulf to talk about this remarkable man.  

    4.6
    Average: 4.6 (5 votes)
    Vote rating for this content.