On the Radio

Week of March 29, 2015

Vaccine Wars

March 29, 2015

Is there any evidence that vaccines cause autism? If the answer is no, then why is anti-vaccination on the rise? Autism. Jenny McCarthy. Measles at Disneyland. How did we get here?

  1. The Least-Vaccinated School in Town

    Producer Charles Monroe-Kane's son goes to a school with a 13.8% non-vaccination rate. So why aren't his neighbors vaccinating their kids? Charles went out searching for the answer.

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  2. The Complicated History of Vaccination

    Why have some parents started second guessing their pediatrician’s advice, to the point that measles is showing up in Disneyland? Historian Arthur Allen explains how we got here.

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  3. The Ethics of Vaccines

    In her book "On Immunity," social critic Eula Biss explores the metaphors and myths hidden within the current vaccine debate. She explains why it's so difficult for the medical community to reason away vaccine fears.

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  4. Kazuo Ishiguro on 'The Buried Giant'

    Kazuo Ishiguro discusses his latest novel, "The Buried Giant." Set in a mythic past with ogres and pixies, it's a dramatic shift from his previous work.

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Lab Lit

March 29, 2015
(was 07.20.2014)

Science is moving out of the lab and into the pages of literary fiction.  This week, we introduce the “Lab Lit” movement and talk about why fiction needs more realistic portrayals of scientists and science culture

  1. Science in Fiction - Jennifer Rohn

    Why aren't there more realistic portrayals of scientists in literary fiction?  Cell biologist and novelist Jennifer Rohn founded LabLit.com, a website that's at the center of the new movement calling for more and better science in fiction. 

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  2. Archangel - Andrea Barrett

    National Book Award winner Andrea Barrett writes some of the most beautiful fiction we know about scientists.  The stories in her new collection, "Archangel" explore the history of knowledge through five linked characters.  After reading it, we're awfully glad she gave up biology to write fiction.

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  3. Sonic Sidebar: Antarctica in Fiction and Art

    Polar science becomes art in the hands of novelist Lucy Jane Bledsoe ("Big Bang Symphony") and musician Paul Miller (aka DJ Spooky). Here are some of their impressions of the continent they can't forget.

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  4. Women and Plants - Elizabeth Gilbert

    Best-selling writer Elizabeth Gilbert brings an intrepid 19th century woman botanist to life in her latest novel, "The Signature of All Things."  In this conversation, she introduces us to the wonder of moss, Darwin's correspondance with "lady scientists" and the 16th century mystic, Jacob Boehme.

    How do you make music from plants?  Here's a recent article about the artist Mileece.

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  5. BookMark - Karl Ove Knausgaard on "The Flame Alphabet"

    Norwegian writer Karl Ove Knausgaard recommends a chilling read:  "The Flame Alphabet" by Ben Marcus.

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  6. On Our Minds: Science and the Avant Garde

    Many of the biggest ideas in science today were dreamed up in the studios of NY's avant garde artists.  So says John Brockman.  He was there.  Today, he brings the same  wide-ranging intellectual spirit to his online science salon, Edge.org.

     

    Want to hear more of Domenico Vicinanza's music from Voyager 1 and 2?  Here it is.

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