On the Radio

Week of May 1, 2016

A Borderless World?

May 1, 2016

There are nearly 250 million migrants across the world right now. Some will be escaping war or oppression, others will be seeking out freedom or economic prosperity, but whatever the reason, the kind of life they're looking for lies across a border that's policed and restricted. What if it didn't have to be that way? This hour, we explore a world without borders.

  1. Artist Molly Crabapple On Why Borders Are Unnecessary

    Artist and activist Molly Crabapple believes borders are soon becoming a thing of the past.

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  2. The Case For Open Borders

    There's a concept that's gaining ground among some economists and the idea's simple -- let anyone who isn't a criminal live and work in any other country. Economist Bryan Caplan and producer Rehman Tungekar explain how this open borders policy could end global poverty.

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  3. Why Borders Are Becoming Irrelevant

    What would a world without national borders look like? There's a good chance it'd look very similar to the one we have today. Parag Khanna is a global strategist who believes borders are becoming irrelevant in an increasingly connected world. More than national boundaries, he believes what matters are the connections between cities.

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  4. Rethinking The History Of Mass Migration In America

    The story of immigration is inseparable from America's history, and usually, it's told as a tale of struggle and ultimate success. It turns out the real story is far more complicated. University of Chicago historian Tara Zahra looks at the period of mass migration to America between 1846-1940. She says it was characterized by deep anxiety, both in the US and Europe.

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  5. Life As An Undocumented Immigrant

    There are currently 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the US. Jose Angel N is one example.

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  6. The Hidden Life of An Economic Migrant

    In "The Year of the Runaways", British novelist Sunjeev Sahota tells the story of three recent immigrants to the UK, and with deft precision examines their struggles, fears, and relationships. Sahota talked about researching the novel -- which was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize last year -- and spoke about geographic privilege.

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74 Is The New 24

May 1, 2016
(was 07.19.2015)

Who says you have to be young to be a pop star? According to Giorgio Moroder, the godfather of disco, "74 is the new 24." Or so says a song on his new album, Deja Vu. But the proclamation may not be that far off. This hour, we talk to two other septuagenarian musicians in addition to Moroder who are still productively making music: the 74-year-old political folk singer Buffy Sainte-Marie, and the 78-year-old minimalist composer Philip Glass. It turns out that playing music late in life also has some neurological benefits. We also talk to Francine Toder, a psychologist who says that learning and playing music benefits the brain.

  1. Giorgio Moroder—The 75-year-old Father of Disco—is Back

    Giorgio Moroder is 75 years old, DJing in front of huge crowds, and experiencing a level of success that he hasn't seen since the 1970s—when he produced some of the first, biggest, and best songs of the disco era. 

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  2. Buffy Sainte-Marie on Her New Album, "Power in the Blood"

    74 year-old Cree musician Buffy Sainte-Marie has done a lot since she was 24. She got her Ph.D. She got politically active in the American Indian Movement and the anti-GMO movement. She raised a family. She was even on Sesame Street for five seasons—and was the first woman to breast feed on American television.

    But most of us know Buffy Sainte-Marie as an iconic 60s folk singer with such hits as "Universal Soldier" and "It's My Way." And now, some 50 years after her debut album, Buffy has a new one. It’s called “Power in the Blood.” This new CD proves that this Oscar, Juno, and Golden Globe award-winning woman's career is not over yet.

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  3. The Benefits of Playing Music in Your Vintage Years

    Thinking about taking piano lessons at 69? Or violin at 73? Maybe guitar after you retire? Well, even if you're not thinking about those things, maybe you should be. According to Francine Toder, author of “The Vintage Years,” learning a musical instrument is one of the best things you can do for your mind and body as you get older.

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  4. Old Masters and Young Geniuses

    David Galenson teaches Economics at the University of Chicago, and he's the author of a book called "Old Masters and Young Geniuses: The Two Life Cycles of Artistic Creativity." His theory is that most artists are either old masters like Cezanne or young geniuses like Picasso.

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  5. Philip Glass on his Memoir "Words Without Music"

    The music of avant-garde composer Philip Glass is distinct and memorable. His span reaches across opera and symphonies to film scores and popular music. One cannot exaggerate the influence this world-renowned composer has had on modern classic music. And now, at 78, Philip Glass has given us one more work to ponder: his memoir, called “Words Without Music.”

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