On the Radio

Week of March 15, 2015

Justice for All?

Race and Justice

March 15, 2015

A police officer's shooting of a young, unarmed Afrian American man here in Madison joins a long list of national tragedies.  So we devote this hour to conversations about race and justice.

  1. Race and Justice in Madison

    Reverend Alex Gee, head of the Fountain of Life Covenant Church, and Erica Nelson, author of a recent report on Madison's racial divide, talk about race relations in the wake of the death of Tony Robinson.

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  2. One Child's Response to Tony Robinson's Death

    Producer Charles Monroe-Kane lives a few blocks from the house where an Afrian-American teenager was recently killed by a white police officer. The impacts of the shooting have been rippling through the mixed-race neighborhood. Charles and his family are whiet. Here's how they are responding.

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  3. Covering "Ghettosides" in South L.A.

    In 2006, journalist Jill Leovy started a blog called "The Homicide Report." Her goal was to document every murder committed in L.A. County -- all 1,000 of them.  She spent two years embedded with homicide detectives, talking with victim's families, witnesses and suspects.  Now Leovy talks about her book, "Ghettoside: A True Story of Murder in America."

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  4. Working for Equal Justice - Bryan Stevenson

    Lawyer Bryan Stevenson talks about his work winning relief for dozens of condemned prisoners and challenging bias against the poor and people of color.

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  5. Investigating a Murder in Mississippi

    Australian filmmaker and prankster John Safran talks about his trip to Mississippi to investigate the murder of a white national named Richard Barrett by a young black man named Vincent McGee.

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Fermentation (Updated)

March 15, 2015

From pickles to kefir, sourdough bread to home-brewed beer --  if it can be cultured or fermented, someone you know is making it.  There's a fermentation revival brewing in urban lofts and rural homesteads.  Today, we explore the science, art and politics of fermented foods.

  1. Ferment This!

    Sauerkraut, kimchee, kefir, kombucha... Sandor Katz calls himself a "fermentation fetishist."  The author of The Art of Fermentation and The Revolution Will Not Be Microwaved explains what's driving today's fermentation revival.

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  2. You Won't Believe What They Eat In Iceland

    Take a big slab of shark meat, bury it in a pit and let it rot.  Then dig it up and hang it in a windy shack for 4 months.  No wonder the Vikings took to sea -- you would too, if dinner was hakarl.

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  3. Smells Bad, Tastes Bad, Covered in Slime

    The Japanese either love or hate these slimy, stinky, fermented soybeans.  Now, natto is gaining popularity with home fermentation enthusiasts. 

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  4. Grow Your Own Clothes

    What if we could harness nature to grow clothing for us?  London-based fashion designer Suzanne Lee explains how she grows cloth inside giant vats of fermented tea. It's part of a future industry she calls "bio-couture".

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  5. The Day The Yogurt Took Over

    The future belongs to a cultured dairy product, in science fiction writer John Scalzi's short story "The Day the Yogurt Took Over."

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  6. What Your Poo Says About You

    At the University of Colorado, microbiologist Rob Knight is exploring a new frontier -- the human microbiome.   His work could revolutionize medicine.  But first we all need to get a lot more comfortable talking about poop.

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  7. Dangerous Idea: Human Vices Help Drive Evolution

    Journalist Elizabeth Kolbert's Dangerous Idea:  human vices are just as important as human virtues in shaping evolution.

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  8. What Comes After Homo Sapiens?

    History began when humans invented gods.  It will end when we become gods.  Yuval Noah Harari's sweeping and provocative Sapiens retells the history of our species from an entirely new perspective.  Homo sapiens rules the world, Harari says, because we are the only animals that can believe in things that exist purely in the imagination. Like money, states, and gods.

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