On the Radio

Week of April 6, 2014

Getting Medieval

04.06.2014

Another season of HBO's "Game of Thrones" is beginning, and the History Channel's "Vikings" is racking up ratings. Why are we so interested in the Middle Ages?

  1. Medieval Combat - Kelly DeVries

    Take a look at any portrayal of the Dark Ages and you might come away believing it was a gruesome and violent time, but is that historically true?

    4
    Average: 4 (3 votes)
  2. Sonic Sidebar: Society for the Creative Anachronism

    Some people people prefer their medieval adventures up close and personal. Producer Aubrey Ralph takes inside one of those groups.

    5
    Average: 5 (3 votes)
  3. A Burnable Book - Bruce Holsinger

    It's been more than 600 years since Geoffrey Chaucer wrote "The Canterbury Tales." Now, medievalist Bruce Holsinger is giving Chaucer some new adventures in a thriller titled "A Burnable Book."

    4
    Average: 4 (2 votes)
  4. Hild - Nicola Griffith

    Nicola Griffith sets her latest novel, "Hild," in seventh-century Britain. The book — Girffith's first piece of historical fiction — tells the story of the young girl who would later grow up to be the influential medieval figure, St. Hilda of Whitby.

    5
    Average: 5 (3 votes)
  5. Why History? - George R. R. Martin

    What's behind the popularity of historical fantasy?  George R. R. Martin, father of "Game of Thrones" has a theory.

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    No votes yet
  6. BookMark: Nick Bantock

    Nick Bantock bookmarks "The Fencing Master" by Arturo Perez-Reverte.

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  7. On Our Minds: Karen Joy Fowler

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    Karen Joy Fowler won the PEN/Faulkner Award for best fiction for her novel "We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves." Based on a true story, it’s the remarkable tale of two girls raised as sisters, until one is removed from the family. The twist is that one sister is a chimpanzee.

    3.25
    Average: 3.3 (4 votes)

Better-abled

04.06.2014

A fashion model with prosthetic legs… a musician who can’t hear… a writer who can’t see. Instead of disabled, differently-abled, handicapped – why not better-abled?

  1. Superpowers - Aimee Mullins

    Athlete and fashion model Aimee Mullins, owner of more than a dozen pairs of the most fabulous prosthetic legs you can imagine.  Her superpowers.

    For photos of Aimee Mullins CLICK HERE.

    5
    Average: 5 (1 vote)
  2. Asking for Help - Haddayr Copley-Woods

    Imagine what it would feel like if everywhere you went, people assumed you needed help… if complete strangers insisted on giving you a hand, whether you wanted it or not?   

     

    4
    Average: 4 (4 votes)
  3. Sonic Sidebar: Eavesdropping

    Writer Stephen Kuusisto is blind and he says that among the many advantages —he gets eavesdrop on the rest of us, because most of the time, we don’t even notice he’s listening.  

    5
    Average: 5 (1 vote)
  4. Touching Sound - Evelyn Glennie

    Dame Evelyn Glennie is considered one of the greatest percussionists alive today.  She’s also deaf. 

    To watch/listen to her perform CLICK HERE.

    5
    Average: 5 (2 votes)
  5. BookMark: Orhan Pamuk

    Nobel Laureate Orhan Pamuk bookmarks "Anna Karenina" by Leo Tolstoy.

    You can also listen to our interview with Pamuk on his novel "Snow."  

    2
    Average: 2 (1 vote)
  6. On Our Minds: Poet Rae Armantrout

    April is National Poetry Month and we’re celebrating with a collection of interviews with major American poets.  Today, Charles Monroe-Kane talks with Pulitzer-prize winning poet Rae Armantrout.

    5
    Average: 5 (2 votes)