On the Radio

Week of August 3, 2014

Image:Michal Sacharewicz Via:Flickr Creative Commons

Hitchhiking

08.03.2014

Does anyone still hitchhike?  Cult film director John Waters does.  At the age of 66, he hitchhiked 2,800 miles, from Baltimore to San Francisco.  He tells us about the people who picked him up, along with some who didn't.  And did the America Interstate System pave the way for fear and violence on the highways?

  1. Killer on the Road - Ginger Strand

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    Ginger Strand talks about her book, "Killer on the Road: Violence and the American Interstate."

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  2. Carsick: Hitchhiking Across America - John Waters

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    John Waters talks about his book, "Carsick: John Waters Hitchhikes Across America."

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  3. Sonic Sidebar: John Waters' Hitchhiking Playlist

    John Waters talks about the playlist of hitchhiking songs that he imagined the characters in his best-case and worst-case scenarios would be listening to when he picked them up,

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  4. Anywhere - Mishy Harman

    Mishy Harman, host of the "Israel Story" radio program, shares his story of trying to win back his ex-girlfriend by hitchhiking around the world.

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  5. Dangerous Idea: Put America Back to Work

    Peter Edelman's Dangerous Idea?   Putting people to work doing things we need done.

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  6. On Our Minds: Joshua Ferris

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    Joshua Ferris talks about his novel, "To Rise Again at a Decent Hour," which made the longlist for The Man Booker Prize.

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Image:Stephane Moussie Via:Flickr Creative Commons

Making Music

08.03.2014

What goes into making new music? And how does hearing new music change the way we listen? From the Avant Garde composers of the 1920s, through Japanese noise music, to punk progenitor Richard Hell, we’re looking at how music - and how we hear it - changes. 

Producer(s): 
  1. Hearing Avant Garde

    In the early 20th century, as visual artists started experimenting with abstraction and surrealism, musicians were experimenting too. But why, nearly 100 years later, are the works of Modern visual artists more popular than Avant Garde music? 

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  2. Noise, Music

    Sixty years after those Avant Garde composers of the 1920s, some Japanese musicians followed in their footsteps, exploring the outer reaches of sound with “noise music.”

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  3. Sonic Sidebar: 40 Part Motet

    One place that new music’s finding audiences is in galleries and museum. One piece in particular has won the hearts of people across the world. It’s called Forty Part Motet.  Sound artist Janet Cardiff uses 40 speakers to play "Spem in Allium," a 40-part Renaissance motet written by Thomas Tallis.   Think of it as Renaissance surround-sound.

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  4. Maria Schneider - Words with Music

    Sometimes making music new is as simple as adding a few new elements. For ground-breaking jazz composer Maria Schneider, that meant adding words (and a few bird calls) to her work.

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  5. Richard Hell - Punk

    Sometimes when musicians break the mold, they end up creating new genres. Richard Hell didn't study music as a kid, but he loved how rock and roll let him experiment with self-expression.

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  6. Dangerous Idea: No More Humanities

    Literary theorist Terry Eagleton's Dangerous Idea? The humanities are dying.

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    Average: 5 (2 votes)
  7. On Our Minds: World War Lessons

    It's the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War One, and with conflict flaring up around the globe, we started wondering just what we know about what started the war that was supposed to “end all wars.”

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