On the Radio

Week of February 22, 2015

Very New Poems

February 22, 2015

Somewhere along the way, did we ruin poetry? Have the heartfelt angst of young lovers and the epic elegies of heroes become elitist and academic? But poetry is back, and we have new technology to thank.

  1. Elegy for a Dead World

    Elegy for a Dead World is a new video game developed by Dejobaan Games, and it's based on some very old-school romantic poets: Shelley, Keats, and Byron. Game designer Ichiro Lambe described the inspiration and execution of a game where players write the story as the game unfolds.

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  2. Narrator-in-residence at the Pfister Hotel

    Poet Anja Sieger, who often writes under the pen name Notanja, is the current Narrator-in-Residence at the storied Pfister Hotel in Milwaukee. Her writing implement of choice? A vintage typewriter.Hear the interview as well as the bonus reading of a poem that she wrote on-site for producer Seth Jovaag's daughter, Lydia.

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  3. A Poet's Glossary

    The celebrated poet Edward Hirsch says the history of poetry is the history of poetic forms. And to prove it he wrote a 700-page compendium about all things poetry.

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  4. The Poet Laureate of Twitter

    Patricia Lockwood is a rising star on the poetry scene. She's been dubbed the "poet laureate of Twitter,” and her latest collection, “Motherland, Fatherland, Homelandsexuals" is making waves. This also includes a bonus reading of Lockwood's poem, "Revealing Nature Photographs."

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  5. A Dangerous idea from John Waters

    Now that gay marriage is (mostly) legal and gay characters are on television, does that mean that gay people have to be "good" all the time? John Waters sure hopes not.

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  6. On Our Minds: Slavery and Capitalism

    When we think of slavery, many of us think of it as an historic trauma—something in the past that the nation"overcame" to become what it is today. But according to Edward Baptist, the instution of slavery drove the economic development and modernization of the United States, and laid the groundwork for American capitalism as we know it today.

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Unidentified Face

Future Faces (Updated)

February 22, 2015

What’s the face of the future? Not flying cars and life on Mars… What’s the future of our faces? With new facial transplantation surgeries and the latest news about the NSA collecting images for facial recognition anaylsis, we're wondering about what we see in the mirror every day.

Also, we hear from America's latest hot new writer, Laura van den Berg, about her debut novel, "Find Me."

Producer(s): 
  1. Focusing on Faces

    Did you know that the National Security Agency has been collecting thousands of photos of faces every day, as part of its facial recognition effort? Turns out, your face is more unique than your fingerprint, and government agencies and private companies are developing new programs to find and identify faces.

    The New York Times' Natasha Singer gives us an update on the state of facial recognition.

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  2. Protecting Faces

    So if you want to protect your privacy when you’re online or on the street, what do you do? Photographer Adam Harvey is developing a DIY solution...

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  3. Sonic Sidebar: Facing Age

    One future that most of face is seeing someone in the mirror we don’t quite recognize. Here’s Donna McNeil’s story about facing aging.

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  4. Changing Faces

    There’s an emerging option for people with severe facial disfigurements. The first facial transplant happened in France in 2006. Since then about 30 people have undergone the grueling surgery. In 2012, Dr. Eduardo Rodriguez led a team at the University of Maryland Medical Center that attempted the most extensive face transplant yet.

    You can also listen to the extended interview with Dr. Rodriguez.

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  5. Dangerous Idea: Downloadable Selves

    Physicist Michio Kaku's Dangerous Idea? A virtual "library of souls."

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  6. On Our Minds: Laura van den Berg

    Literary critics have deemed Laura van den Berg one of American's best new writers. Listen in as she talks about the roles of memory and forgetting in our lives, and in her debut novel, "Find Me."

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