Reconciliation

November 6, 2016

 After one of the ugliest and most divisive presidential races in history -- can America heal? Weeks of vitriolic campaign rhetoric have taken a toll on friends and families. A majority of voters are disgusted with politics and don’t believe the next president will be able to unite the country. So where do we go from here? This hour, a look at reconciliation -- how to recover personal and political harmony.

  1. Unfriended Over Politics

    A few months ago, Lisa Schiffren noticed a change in her Facebook interactions. As a conservative columnist, she's used to sharing articles and hosting (mostly) friendly debates, but in the last months of the campaign season, the conversational tone on her feed grow angrier and more antagonistic. She tells Anne Strainchamps that she's lost friends over this election season and that some of them, she won't miss.

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  2. How the Founding Feuds Shaped the Nation

    Conventional wisdom holds that the founding fathers were a group of esteemed gentlemen who peacefully united under a common cause. Historian Paul Aron tells a different story. In his book "Founding Feuds," Aron follows the bitter rivalries and intense conflicts in the early days of the republic. He says our nation's founders could be just as vicious and scathing as politicians today.

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  3. Liberal and Conservative Till Death Do Us Part

    Jeanne Safer and Richard Brookhiser would seem like an unlikely couple. She's a lifelong liberal, while he's a senior editor for the conservative National Review, and yet the two have been happily married for more than 35 years. They shared the secrets of a lasting marriage across party lines.

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  4. Esperanza Spalding on Jazz and Reconciliation

    Jazz performer Esperanza Spalding shares what a lifetime of improvising has taught her about reconciliation.

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  5. Artists and Frenemies

    Most people think of conflict as something to be avoided, but there's another way to view it -- as creative and generative. In his book "The Art of Rivalry," Boston Globe art critic Sebastian Smee explores how intense conflicts, broken friendships and personal reconciliations fueled some of the most dramatic breakthroughs in Modern Art. He tells Steve Paulson that the rivalry between Picasso and Matisse contributed, in part, to cubism.

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  6. Thomas Kunkel on 'Here Is New York'

    Journalist and educator Thomas Kunkel recommends "Here Is New York" by E.B. White.

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  7. Jacqueline Woodson's 'Another Brooklyn'

    This month the National Book Awards will announce this year’s winners. Among the finalists is Jacqueline Woodson’s novel “Another Brooklyn.” It’s her first adult novel in two decades, and it's the story of the friendship among four girls in the Bushwick neighborhood -- that’s where Woodson herself grew up.  She told Steve Paulson this kind of “black girl narrative” didn’t exist when she was younger - and she’s always wished she had books like this to read.
     

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