Singing the Revolution

January 22, 2012
(was 01.16.2011)

We sang it during the civil rights movement, on marches, on buses, and in the face of violence.  We sang it for workers rights, and to protest the war in Vietnam, on the mall in Washington.  Sometimes, we sang it hand in hand, our arms criss-crossed across our bodies, swaying.  More than any other, “We Shall Overcome” has become the to-go song to summon courage and hope, and a spark to ignite or sustain a revolution.  In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge, singing the revolution.

  1. Sean Wilentz on Dylan and Politics

    Historian Sean Wilentz tells Jim Fleming the birth of Dylan’s music is deeply bound up in the politics of the time.

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  2. Stuart Stotts on "We Shall Overcome"

    If there is one song more than any other that shimmers with political and emotional resonance, it’s “We Shall Overcome.”

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  3. Deb Olin Unferth on Living the Nicaraguan Revolution

    Deb Olin Unferth was swept up in the 80's revolution in Central American out of love.

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  4. Joshua Clover on 1989 Music and Politics

    Joshua Clover explains the subtitle of his book, “1989: Bob Dylan Didn’t Have This To Sing About.”

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