What's on This Week

01.31.2016
Reading books isn't always the best way to learn. Some things you need to learn from your elders, and their wisdom has often been passed down through the generations. We celebrate...
01.31.2016
Image: Jon Winters via: flickr
Reality is catching up to science fiction. But there are still new science-fiction writers who are thinking the unthinkable and daring to go beyond the limits of our imaginations.

On Our Minds

children playing football
With the Carolina Panthers facing off against the Denver Broncos in Superbowl 50, football is on our minds this week. And for many of the millions of fans who tune in every...
Felicia Day
Web video superstar Felicia Day talks about how the Internet allowed her to use her weirdness to achieve her dreams of becoming an actress and to fulfill her creative...
What do you do when you’re an African-American filmmaker living in a country full of people who dress up in blackface at Christmastime?  You pick up a camera. Roger Ross...
Garth Risk Hallberg's "City on Fire" is this year's big debut novel. It's a sweeping 900-page story about New York City in the mid-70s, chronicling everything from the punk...
We're honoring Veterans Day with a story from Glenn Boyd. He's a WWII vet who served in the Pacific theater along with his 2 brothers. He told his story to Thor Ringler, the...

Sci-Fi Authors Get Real

Our executive producer Steve Paulson has interviewed a lot of science fiction writers this year, and he noticed a trend: writers ditching tropes like "warp drives" and "transporters" to tackle harder (yet much more probable) science problems. These authors include some of the biggest in the genre—from breakout self-publishing star Andy Weir to veteran Neal Stephenson. According to Stephenson, "If we want a better future, maybe we need better stories." Read and listen to Steve's article for NPR here.