What's on This Week

02.14.2016
If you've ever been alone on Valentine's Day, you probably know how isolating it can be to feel like the only single person in a world full of happy couples. But being alone doesn...
02.14.2016
You score a royal flush in poker!  Do you credit your skill... or luck?  We talk with a poker champion, a game designer, an investment banker and a choreographer about how to...

On Our Minds

Kirk Lynn's debut novel "Rules for Werewolves" is the story of a group of young, homeless, angry kids running from their families and roaming the suburbs of Los Angeles like...
Psychologists John and Julie Gottman are famous for being able to predict with 94% accuracy whether a couple will break up, stay together unhappily, or stay together happily...
American Wendy Doniger holds two doctorates in Sanskrit and Indian studies from Harvard and Oxford. She’s the author of numerous books on Hinduism and has translated several...
children playing football
With the Carolina Panthers facing off against the Denver Broncos in Superbowl 50, football is on our minds this week. And for many of the millions of fans who tune in every...
Felicia Day
Web video superstar Felicia Day talks about how the Internet allowed her to use her weirdness to achieve her dreams of becoming an actress and to fulfill her creative...

Sci-Fi Authors Get Real

Our executive producer Steve Paulson has interviewed a lot of science fiction writers this year, and he noticed a trend: writers ditching tropes like "warp drives" and "transporters" to tackle harder (yet much more probable) science problems. These authors include some of the biggest in the genre—from breakout self-publishing star Andy Weir to veteran Neal Stephenson. According to Stephenson, "If we want a better future, maybe we need better stories." Read and listen to Steve's article for NPR here.