What's on This Week

02.07.2016
Coca-Cola elevator in Las Vegas
Do you ever get the feeling that this is Big Soda's world and we're just living in it? Even though soda sales have declined in recent years, Big Soda looms large in our popular...
02.07.2016
With shows in Milan, Paris and New York, it's fashion month across the Western World, and people are turning their eyes to runways. But does fashion really matter? Truth is, the...

On Our Minds

American Wendy Doniger holds two doctorates in Sanskrit and Indian studies from Harvard and Oxford. She’s the author of numerous books on Hinduism and has translated several...
children playing football
With the Carolina Panthers facing off against the Denver Broncos in Superbowl 50, football is on our minds this week. And for many of the millions of fans who tune in every...
Felicia Day
Web video superstar Felicia Day talks about how the Internet allowed her to use her weirdness to achieve her dreams of becoming an actress and to fulfill her creative...
What do you do when you’re an African-American filmmaker living in a country full of people who dress up in blackface at Christmastime?  You pick up a camera. Roger Ross...
Garth Risk Hallberg's "City on Fire" is this year's big debut novel. It's a sweeping 900-page story about New York City in the mid-70s, chronicling everything from the punk...

Sci-Fi Authors Get Real

Our executive producer Steve Paulson has interviewed a lot of science fiction writers this year, and he noticed a trend: writers ditching tropes like "warp drives" and "transporters" to tackle harder (yet much more probable) science problems. These authors include some of the biggest in the genre—from breakout self-publishing star Andy Weir to veteran Neal Stephenson. According to Stephenson, "If we want a better future, maybe we need better stories." Read and listen to Steve's article for NPR here.