What's on This Week

11.16.2014
“Death is not a failure,” writes Dr. Atul Gawande. “Death may be the enemy, but it is also the natural order of things.” We live much longer than we used to, thanks to medical...
11.16.2014
Image: Bryan Pearson Via: Flickr Creative Commons
The average American spends more time on Facebook than with their pets or exercising -- and that's not counting Twitter, Instagram, or Vine. We're more connected than ever these...

On Our Minds

Matches
In the second hour of the death series, Pam Wald talked about helping her husband Ben - then terminally ill - use Oregon's Death with Dignity Act to speed the end of his life...
Image: tennesseevalleyauthority Via: Flickr Creative Commons
In her latest book, "This Changes Everything," journalist Naomi Klein takes a critical view of our current approaches to climate change. She sees the solution resting in the...
Doctors face an almost impossible dilemma when it comes to end-of-life care. They want to do everything possible to keep their patients alive and healthy for as long as...
A coffin that transforms into an entertainment center
Picking out the perfect coffin isn't something you have to save until the last minute! A variety of DiY coffin makers across the country are making functional coffins that...
Lani Leary knows death intimately. As a psychotherapist and hospice counselor, she’s worked with thousands of dying people and their families, and she’s been at the bedside...

Your Photos of Remembrance

Necklace

"After my second miscarriage, the hospital gave me this necklace as a remembrance of my daughter."

During the second hour of the death series, we asked you to send in photos of how you remember people you've lost. Maybe there's a necklace of your grandmother’s reminds you of her, or an old friend you remember every time you see a car that looks like his. Maybe you keep a photo of an uncle on your mantel or mark a cousin's life by going out dancing once a month.

However you hold on to the memory of someone you've lost, please share a photo and a short description of who you're remembering and how.

Here's a link to photos other listeners have sent in. You can post your photo to Twitter or Instagram using the hashtag #TTBOOKonDeath, or email them to us.