What's on This Week

03.08.2015
Fashion Show
With shows in Milan, Paris and New York, it's fashion month across the Western World, and people are turning their eyes to runways. But does fashion really matter? Truth is, the...
03.08.2015
Composer Stephen Sondheim does it and so does hip hop poet MK Asante.  They combine words and music to make art.  So how do they do it?   We explore the neuroscience of rap, and...

On Our Minds

    Philosopher Lars Svendsen recalls being met with outrage when he told his colleagues he was writing a book on fashion. After all, it’s a subject that’s often viewed as...
Edmund White reflects on his life as a writer and activist Back in 2013, Edmund White got married. Like so many places around the country, his home state of New York began to...
Fashion Show
A lot of people dismiss fashion as frivolous, but Media Studies professor Minh-Ha Pham says it's a great lens through which to study race, gender and class politics. "Fashion...
Vietnam
This weekend marks the 50th anniversary of the first US combat troops landing in Vietnam. In the United States, we tend to view Vietnam almost exclusively through the lens of...
Voting Sign
Should more people opt out of voting? As the supreme court considers redistricting rules around the country, we're listening back to this interview with Georgetown...

Love in 36 Questions

Back in 2013, Edmund White got married. Like so many places around the country, his home state of New York began to issue gay marriage licences—but White’s motivation wasn’t activism or even romantic love. His walk to the altar was driven by practical concerns: his longtime partner, Michael Carroll, was going to lose his health insurance unless they tied the knot.

In this wide-ranging interview with Anne Strainchamps, White speaks with the insight of a man who has seen firsthand the key moments in the struggle for gay rights over the last half of the 20th century and the first 15 years of the 21st, from Stonewall to the AIDS crisis to gay marriage. While late to embrace the specific cause of gay marriage, the “reluctant groom” (as he once called himself), is finding the institution largely comfortable, as well as legally and economically beneficial. And yet, he is still a sharp and occasionally critical observer of the political and personal struggle for gay rights.