Science and Technology

"Poison Squad" Volunteers taking in a dinner with a side of Borax.

Complain all you want about over-zealous government regulators, but without them, we’d still be drinking dirt in our coffee and finding formaldehyde in our baby formula. Deborah Blum shares all the gory details with Steve Paulson.
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A poison garden

Amy Stewart is a serious gardener with a side gig – writing about all the plants that could kill you.More

A glowing radium clock.

How painting radium on watches and instrument dials killed more than 50 young women working in Ottawa, Illinois.More

Baby, new to this world

If you think of your life as a series of births, what changes? Why does the birth metaphor matter?More

Code

Machines that program themselves are all around us and they get smarter every day. But are you ready for the master algorithm that can tell a machine how to learn anything?More

Apps

App Intelligence? Santa Fe Institute president David Krakauer says we're on the verge of abdicating our free will to everyday apps.More

Black hole

Researchers revisit the controversial but potentially life-changing treatment first explored in the 1960s.More

A semi-motionless ashtray

Why Errol Morris is still outraged by the famous philosopher of science.More

#MeToo

For years, women in science have battled discrimination, old boys’ clubs and gendered stereotypes. Now they’re blowing the whistle on sexual harassment, and some eminent career scientists are being held to account.More

Inside a space capsule

Physicist Don Gurnett has recorded what you might hear from inside a spacecraft, and it isn't just the sound of desolate silence.More

The IceCube Lab at the South Pole

Francis Halzen, the lead scientist of the IceCube Neutrino Detector, explains how light sensors buried deep in the ice at the South Pole detected a neutrino that traveled four billion light-years.More

A bee's communication infrastructure

Tania Munz recently wrote a biography of Karl von Frisch — the German scientist who cracked the mystery of the honeybee’s waggle dance, which shows the rest of the hive precisely where to find a new food source miles away.More

many bees

Christof Koch, a leading neuroscientist in the field of consciousness, says bees are smarter than we ever imagined.More

Where Heather and the bees converse

A single empty yellow chair sits next to Heather Swan’s tall, buzzing beehive in her backyard in Madison, Wisconsin. Swan keeps it there to sit next to the bees — some 60,000 insects —and talk with them.More

a single bee in a prairie

A poem by Emily Dickinson, read by Anne Strainchamps.More

Pro-bee is pro-human

When we talk about bees, usually we mean honeybees. Or bumblebees. But that’s just two out of 20,000 different species of bees. Thor Hanson tells Anne about how different species of bees and humanity have developed dependence on one another.More

Detroit Hives

In many parts of Detroit, there are blighted, abandoned patches of land. Instead of looking the other way, Timothy Paule and Nicole Lindsey started buying up vacant lots and building bee hives as an act of urban renewal.More

honey as a cure

A poem by Karina Borowicz, read by Stephanie Elkins.More

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