Nature

against nature

How do you go from producing riveting stories about real people for "This American Life" to writing surreal short stories? Diane Cook is the person to ask.

Goshawk in flight

Shattered by her father's sudden death, writer Helen Macdonald began dreaming of wild hawks.  In an effort to move beyond her grief, she bought and trained a wild goshawk — one of the world's fiercest birds of prey.   But between the bird and her grief, she became, in her words "more hawk than human."

An outhouse. For pooping

At the University of Colorado, microbiologist Rob Knight is exploring a new frontier — the human microbiome.

foggy trees

Suzanne Simard is a forest ecologist who's revolutionizing our understanding of trees. She has discovered that trees use underground networks to communicate and cooperate with each other. It turns out that whole forests can exist as a superorganism.

Cox was the first person to complete a 1.2 mile swim in Antarctica, from the ship Orlova to Neko Harbor in 25 minutes.

Lynne Cox is an extreme swimmer. At 18, she swam between the islands of New Zealand. She broke the men's and women's records for the English Channel. Then she did the unthinkable — swimming to Antarctica.

Trees

Botanist Diana Beresford-Kroeger tells Anne that the lives of trees and human beings are inter-related all the way down to the molecular level.

bear

Tina Bertoni provides a commentary on what it was like to hunt a bear.

"Field and Stream" Associate Editor Kim Hiss tells Anne Strainchamps about her first hunt.

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