How Do You Face The Hate On Your Doorstep?

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For the first time since World War II, far-right and neo-fascist groups are winning converts and votes — all over Europe and also here at home. Why is it happening, and can it be stopped? In this hour, we hear stories from Germany, Italy, the Netherlands and the Milwaukee suburbs. Each one begs the question: what do you do when fascism wears a familiar face?

Adolph Hitler
Audio

If hate moved next door, would you recognize it? Edgar Feuchtwanger was a young Jewish boy living in Munich when Adolf Hitler moved into the building across the street. Edgar recalls the horror of watching Hitler's rise to power.More

Length: 
6:57
Benito Mussolini, during the march on Rome, with some of the quadriumviri: from left Emilio De Bono, Italo Balbo and Cesare Maria De Vecchi.
Articles

A new museum of fascism is scheduled to open in Predappio, Italy—the birthplace of Benito Mussolini. The town is already a pilgrimage site for neo-Fascist groups. Journalist Ilaria Maria Sala says the Mussolini museum has sparked controversy.More

Length: 
8:18
Fighter jets
Articles

From the European Union to the United States, analysts have claimed that the Western world is seeing a resurgence of populism. Dutch philosopher Rob Riemen disagrees though, he says it's time to call the problem what it is: fascism.More

Length: 
11:23
Pardeep Singh Kaleka and Arno Michaelis
Audio

Pardeep Singh Kaleka's father was murdered when a white supremacist attacked the Sikh temple that his father led. Remarkably, he and a former white supremacist met just two months after the massacre. Now, they work together.More

Length: 
14:58
Dictators who are also authors
Articles

When they weren’t committing mass murder, many of the noteworthy authoritarian leaders of the 20th century wrote books. Terrible books. Journalist Daniel Kalder read all of them.More

Length: 
7:57
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Last Updated: 
4 months 3 weeks ago